Spex Blog

Cassie

Meet Teimana, a 7 year old boy with Mitochondrial Disease and Leigh Syndrome.

Teimana was 2 months old when he was diagnosed with the rare condition and was given 1-2 years to live. But he is 7 now and ‘doing pretty great’.

Mitochondrial disease (mito) is a debilitating and potentially fatal disease that reduces the ability of the mitochondria to produce this energy. When the mitochondria are not working properly, cells begin to die until eventually whole organ systems fail and the patient’s life itself is compromised.

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Spex Ltd is excited to announce our first distributor for India, SCOOT Mobility! This is a new opportunity for wheelchair users in India to now access the Spex range of proven clinical specialised wheelchair seating.

Spex seating technology is a simplified seating system that can be configured for wheelchair users with a wide range of positioning requirements including complex postures.

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Cassie

This blog aims to provide some guidance on the potential causes and presentations of tight hamstrings for wheelchair users. Seating solutions will be considered along with how Spex cushions can help to manage outcomes for functional seating.

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Cassie

Before exploring comfort in wheeled seated mobility, it is useful to look at how comfort is defined in the dictionary:

Lexico Online Dictionary

Oxford Learners Dictionary

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Cassie

Welcome to Part 2 of this series exploring the effect back supports can have on sitting posture. First, to recap:

The back support height and width selection is dependent on a number of factors. The base of the back support generally runs from the height of the posterior superior iliac spines (PSIS) to the chosen height against the user’s back depending on the support needed for stability and the freedom of movement required at the shoulders (e.g. if a wheelchair user is self-propelling).

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We are celebrating a six special years of our SuperShape back support technology! Ella was the very first person to be fitted with our initial prototype six years ago.

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How does Spex offer off-the-shelf solutions for complex postures?

Basic wheelchair measurements include the shoulder width, chest width (from armpit to armpit) and hip width. These width measures must be considered and accommodated when prescribing the wheelchair chassis and corresponding modular seating options to optimise:

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The back support, cushion height and width selection is dependent on a number of factors. The base of the back support generally runs from the height of the posterior superior iliac spines (PSIS) to the chosen height against the user’s back depending on the support needed for stability and the freedom of movement required at the shoulders (e.g. if a wheelchair user is self-propelling).

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The Spex team joined our first exhibition post-COVID, at the ATS-NZ Bariatric Product Education Day in Christchurch New Zealand, on the 13th October 2020.
 

We were excited to showcase some of the latest Spex innovations, including the new bariatric range which is not yet released. Discover what was on show in our expo wrap video!

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This article is a simple refresher to pelvic anatomy, what we mean by ‘stability’ and how we can optimise this in wheelchair sitting. Clinical evidence to support this blog is listed at the end. An introduction to pelvic anatomy and an anatomically neutral position in sitting.
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Wheelchair users often require postural support devices (PSD’s) such as chest straps/harnesses to reinforce support and optimise function within the wheelchair seating system. This allows support in both the sagittal and coronal planes for stability of the wheelchair user in the wheelchair.  

Anterior trunk support may include chest straps and chest harnesses.

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When providing a seating solution, the focus is generally on the seating cushion, back support and footrests. The primary contact surfaces are the starting point, always, as these provide the major contributions to alignment and stability at the weight-bearing surfaces at the pelvis and the trunk and feet in sitting. There are additional postural support devices and accessories that help to maintain posture in sitting so that sitting effort is reduced, and pressure is offloaded for comfort and skin integrity.

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